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Sydney Weekender BB Masterclass

November 1, 2010

 

Video of Beef and Beer Masterclass

June 29, 2010

Here is a taster of the beef and Beer Masterclass.

 

Beef and beer masterclass

March 10, 2010

Beef and Beer masterclass has been launched and wed love you to come to the next one.

I thought I’d write a little review on the day or better still quote from some people who where here.

“There are just some partnerships that are undeniably perfect for each other. For me, beef and beer are just one of those partnerships (to all the wine drinkers I say beer > wine :P ) and so when Craig of Mumu Grill teamed up with Dan the beer snob of Beer Snobs I knew something magical was going to happen. Two people, one with a deep passion for cooking organic and sustainable meats to perfection and other with a deep passion for drinking only perfection come together to teach us average Joes how to enjoy what we put in our mouths on a different level.”

This quote and pictures from Herecomesthefood.com.au

The format will be one hour in the kitchen with me followed by one hour outside with Dan.

While in the kitchen we will look at beef cuts, different cooking techniques,Basic rubs, and BBQ Salads. During the kitchen time we will of course be having a beer, after all, what is a BBQ without one. All attendees will cook in my kitchen.

Once an hour has been spent learning about beef, all the food will be plated up ( yes you will be marked on your plating just as in masterchef). then outside to spend an hour eating the meat and talking/ learning about beer. you will taste apporx 5-7 beers with your meal going thru various production techniques flavour profiles and all the technical stuff.

Our beer guide will be Dan from http://www.Beersnobs.com.au

These Photos are from Jenius.com.au

Here is the beersnobs philosophy

Dan and Graham were sick of preaching to the converted, or more to the point, the converted were sick of their preaching. Whinging to the same group of mates about the lack of craft beer at their local pub; the evils of the mainstream beer domination effecting choice at sporting arenas across the country; and just how damn good a locally brewed Witbier tastes when matched with a bowl of mussels cooked in tomato, garlic, onions and chilli.

With the ethos of … encouraging Australian drinkers to appreciate quality… one boutique beer at time, we believe that the best way to address the issues plaguing our society is to create more Beer Snobs!!! And with this, Beer Snobs Pty Ltd was born.
After running these classes in October we had an overwhelming response to the entertainment value of this morning. This would be a great gift for either sex as well as a great team building exercise or a corporate event

Please read the bloggs about the event we have not had anything but rave reviews so far. I hope to have you in my kitchen soon

 

Aprons will be supplied.
Recipes will be given to you to keep.
Classes are limited to 16 people.
Payment will be taken at time of booking. $110 per person
Bookings can be made by calling the Restaurant on 94606877.

 

Olympic Sailors Lunch,

February 24, 2012

Belcher Page invitation

improvise and add Ribs SMH 29/11/11

December 1, 2011
tags:

Improvise and add rib November 29, 2011

Meat-lovers can’t go past those delicious morsels on the bone, writes Tim Elliott.

Craig Macindoe doesn’t like meat, he loves it. Jamon, chorizo, grass-fed beef, meatballs … chooks, ducks, pigs, fish – if it has eyes and a pulse, Macindoe will eat it. But there is a special table in the big man’s heart reserved for ribs.

”Everyone loves ribs,” the owner of Mumu Grill, Crows Nest, says. ”There’s a primal aspect to them: you get your hands dirty, sauce dribbles down your chin. It’s great for social occasions, like barbecues, because you put your bib on, lose your pretentiousness and dig in.”

And his admiration is in line with summer’s top barbecue ingredient.

Advertisement: Story continues below
Macindoe’s barbecued ribs. Photo: Danielle Smith
Macindoe started cooking ribs in 1988 at Sydney’s Hard Rock Cafe, when he was 17. ”Back then we cooked them with a barbecue sauce made from pickled watermelon rind.”

But it wasn’t until 1991, when he set up a Hard Rock Cafe in Hawaii, that he discovered the particular esteem in which ribs are regarded by Americans. ”Ribs are all about the process, not the initial product,” he says. ”Over there they have a real love of building your own barbecue and smoking them for four hours in your own special wood chips. And they pride themselves on different ribs, sauces and marinades.”

These days Mumu Grill hosts five or six Rib Fests a year ($45 for all you can eat); Macindoe also holds rib cooking classes twice monthly. ”People want to feel confident at barbecues. Most of them feel intimidated by the time it takes to prepare ribs, because it can be quite slow and you need patience.”

The meat on ribs are the intercostal muscles, designed to hold the ribcage together. Consequently, ribs are tough. This traditionally made them a cheap cut, which cooks gussied up with a kaleidoscope of sauces.

The recent vogue of the cut has pushed the price of pork ribs from $10 a kilogram wholesale three years ago to $16.50. Other options are beef back ribs or, for a slightly fattier meat, lamb ribs. The essential ingredient is patience. ”You can’t rush it. You need to braise the ribs … 2½ hours before you put them on the barbecue.”

Pork spare ribs
Cater 500 grams to 750 grams of ribs a person (two to three kilograms for four people). In a large, oven-proof dish with a lid, make a sauce with 500 grams whole, unskinned cumquats, five peeled mandarins, 250 grams long red chillis, 120 grams garlic and two litres Coca-Cola. Add half a tablespoon star anise, half a cinnamon quill, one tablespoon Sichuan pepper, season to taste. Add ribs; if sauce doesn’t cover them, add Chinese cooking wine. Braise ribs, covered, in oven on low heat for at least 2½ hours or until meat is coming off the bone and sauce has reduced. Remove ribs and blend sauce with a stick blender. Return ribs to sauce and allow to cool. Cook ribs on barbecue at full heat for 10 minutes; allow them to char but turn every minute or so and paint liberally with sauce. “The sauce will caramelise,” Macindoe says. “It’s all about the colour – you want that lovely, dark brown gloss.” Serve with beer.

Serves 4

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/cuisine/improvise-and-add-rib-20111126-1nztg.html#ixzz1fF8vMBXh

Dates and Time for Tapas Class

November 25, 2011

February

 

Monday 20th 6pm

Tuesday21st 6pm

wednesday 22nd 6pm

Thursday 23rd 6pm

Friday24th 12midday

Tuesday 28th 6pm

March

Thursday 1st 6pm

Friday 2nd 12 midday

Sunday 4th Midday and 5pm

Monday 5th 6pm

Tuesday 6th 6pm

Wednesday 7th 6pm

Thursday8th 6pm

Friday 9th Midday

Saturday 10th2pm

Sunday 11th 12 midday and 5pm

Monday12th 6pm

Tuesday13th 6pm

Wednesday 14th Booked Out

Thursday 15th 6pm

Friday 16th Midday

Monday 19th 6pm

 

New Dates will go up 5weeks in advance

Please email prefered 3 dates to Cooking@mumugrill.com.au and we will allocate classes.

Please email prefered dates, even if the class is not posted.

We will endevour to put classes on to match your desired dates. Thank you

Classes are 3hours long.
Please be on time we will start dead on time.

Handcrafted Beer Dinners- $110

November 17, 2011

MUMU Prides itself in providing for select groups, our “Handcraft Beer Dinner”.

Where we match a number of dishes with beer, as well as cook with beer. The dinners are limited to 24 persons and can be booked at different dates for birthdays, bucks, special or corporate events.

Our aim is to showcase the different flavours of the different styles of beer, as well as introduce the concept of beer with desert or an accompaniment to food in general as an alternative to wine.

I  organised a test dinner if you like with some regulars and social media friends to test the food, beer and overall experience.  So we can deliver a superior quality product at the right price to the consumer. Sort of, a focus group, I know why were you not invited. Sorry. That’s the gig and somebody has to do it.

Menu

Grass fed Angus Pure Beef Tartare on cruets as a welcome starter matched with Moo Brew Hefeweizen

“A classic German Wheat beer, this is naturally cloudy with a vibrant yellow colour and strong foam head.” (Moorilla website)

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18 mth Jamon Serrano matched with Murray’s Pilsner.

“Murray’s Pilsner is our interpretation of Pilsner made vaguely in the North German style. Made with classic German malts and using a traditional pilsner/lager process of cold fermentation and extended conditioning periods, Murray’s Pilsner is the only bottle-conditioned Pilsner brewed in Australia. This retains the freshness of the beer by eliminating oxidation”

Oysters  natural matched with Marstons Oyster Stout.

“Traditionally in London at about the time of Dickens, Stout and Oysters were the poor man’s meal, taken as good hearty tasty food.

There are no Oysters in Oyster Stout, but the association is well established and you can now enjoy this great tasting traditional English Stout.

The unique character of Oyster Stout is brought about by fermentation with the Marston’s strain of yeast. Taken from the Burton Unions, this yeast is very active and gives full attenuation of beer giving a dry clean after-palate.

English Aroma Hops, Fuggles and Goldings are added for their fruity, floral and spicy contribution to the taste with the majority of the bitterness coming from the roasted malts. The final result is a rich, dark and extremely creamy smooth stout with good character and strength.”

Slow cooked pork shoulder cooked in beer and sage matched with  Pigs Fly Pale Ale.

“For those of you who appreciate how a good beer is crafted, pale ales are made using a pure pale malt, fermented with a top fermenting ale yeast. This very clever yeast allows a faster and warmer fermentation than a lager, and the pale malt gives the beer its golden-copper colour. This warmer fermentation process allows for the formation of esters. Esters give the brew a distinct fruity or citrus aroma. Special yeast strains can also be used to give a nutty or savoury character.

What about that fantastic taste? Well it’s all down to the hops. Hops give beer a bit of backbone and character. We use two types of hops in Pigs Fly Pale Ale. Cascade hops which give it that fruity, floral taste at the front of your palate, while the chinook hops bring it all home with a unique bitterness at the back.” Pigs Fly website

Angus pure T-Bone cooked Tagilatta style slow cooked with rosemary and garlic matched with Knapstein Reserve Ale

Braised Cuttlefish and Chorizo matched with Red Emperor Red Ale.

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And Lastly Sour Cherry Chocolate Tart with Moo Brew Dark ale .

“This American brown ale presents dark with a hint of brooding sherry-red.”

I have used the photos from the food bloggers who came to the event. My thanks goes out to them please click on the photos to see what they thought of the event. I had a great time but I would rather you get their opinion.

Beef and Beer Masterclass Times and Dates

November 7, 2011
tags: ,

February

Saturday 25th 10am,

March

Wednesday 7th 5.15pm

Saturday 10th 10am, 11am

Wednesday 14th 5.15pm

Saturday 17th 10am, 11am

 

please email your prefered dates to cooking@mumugrill.com.au with your contact details and Scott will contact you back to allocate your class.

Thanks Craig

Interview about Beef Brands

September 21, 2011

Interview on 702 about Beef

September 21, 2011
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